THANK YOU TO OUR 2022 SPEAKERS

This carefully-selected group of innovative global and South African Legal specialists zoned in on the technology and ideas that are transforming the way law firms and in-house legal teams operate.

Tessa Manuello Founder & CEO Legal Creatives (BRA)
Rebotile Bopape GM Legal: SAR and Corporate MultiChoice
Nathan-Ross Adams Data and Tech Lawyer Michalsons
Elizabeth de Stadler Director The Rehabilitated Lawyer (Pty) Ltd
Leah Molatseli Head of Business Development Legal Interact
Anna Posthumus Meyjes Legal Designer / Founder Aclara Legal Design (NL)
Serena Horn Senior Legal Advisor Digital and Innovation The Standard Bank of South Africa Limited
Isabel Parker Executive Director The Digital Legal Exchange (UK)
Celia Pienaar Legal Service Improvement Manager Bowmans
George Candiotes Independent Former Group Head of Legal at Telkom
Mitch Kowalski General Counsel and Compliance Officer Aoyuan International (CAN)
Rob Green CEO Umbiie.com
Caryn Sandler Partner + Chief Knowledge and Innovation Officer Gilbert + Tobin Lawyers (AUS)
Dr Lee Swales Attorney and Law Lecturer Livingston Leandy Incorporated
Anneke Blignaut Technology Manager LGR Incorporated
Terri Mottershead Executive Director, Centre for Legal Innovation (Australia, New Zealand and Asia Pacific) The College of Law (AUS)
Darren Tiplady Head Of Information Systems Law For All
Paul Waugh CEO LightHub Inc
Justin Cornish CEO Lighthouse Law
Prof Danny Myburgh MD Cyanre The Digital Forensic Lab
Naomi Thompson Director PwC
Rorisang Mzozoyana Senior Legal Counsel Financial Institution
Kimlynne Olivier Associate Director Compliance, Forensics, and Intelligence Control Risks
Jason van Dijk Global Director Legal & Technology Hub Exigent
Rico Burnett Global Director of Client Innovation Exigent
Carina Wessels Executive: Governance, Legal, Compliance & Sustainability Alex Forbes
Maurice Crespi Partner Schindlers Si & CEO of Virtual Nation Builders
Tessa Manuello Founder & CEO Legal Creatives (BRA)
Rebotile Bopape GM Legal: SAR and Corporate MultiChoice
Nathan-Ross Adams Data and Tech Lawyer Michalsons
Elizabeth de Stadler Director The Rehabilitated Lawyer (Pty) Ltd
Leah Molatseli Head of Business Development Legal Interact
Anna Posthumus Meyjes Legal Designer / Founder Aclara Legal Design (NL)
Serena Horn Senior Legal Advisor Digital and Innovation The Standard Bank of South Africa Limited
Isabel Parker Executive Director The Digital Legal Exchange (UK)
Celia Pienaar Legal Service Improvement Manager Bowmans
George Candiotes Independent Former Group Head of Legal at Telkom
Mitch Kowalski General Counsel and Compliance Officer Aoyuan International (CAN)
Rob Green CEO Umbiie.com
Caryn Sandler Partner + Chief Knowledge and Innovation Officer Gilbert + Tobin Lawyers (AUS)
Dr Lee Swales Attorney and Law Lecturer Livingston Leandy Incorporated
Anneke Blignaut Technology Manager LGR Incorporated
Terri Mottershead Executive Director, Centre for Legal Innovation (Australia, New Zealand and Asia Pacific) The College of Law (AUS)
Darren Tiplady Head Of Information Systems Law For All
Paul Waugh CEO LightHub Inc
Justin Cornish CEO Lighthouse Law
Prof Danny Myburgh MD Cyanre The Digital Forensic Lab
Naomi Thompson Director PwC
Rorisang Mzozoyana Senior Legal Counsel Financial Institution
Kimlynne Olivier Associate Director Compliance, Forensics, and Intelligence Control Risks
Jason van Dijk Global Director Legal & Technology Hub Exigent
Rico Burnett Global Director of Client Innovation Exigent
Carina Wessels Executive: Governance, Legal, Compliance & Sustainability Alex Forbes
Maurice Crespi Partner Schindlers Si & CEO of Virtual Nation Builders

Metalaw: Designing the Future of The Law in The Metaverse

The metaverse is the world's most important technology that can potentially change forever the way we work, transact and socialize in a globally inter-connected world. Metaverse-Related Economy Could Be as Much as $13 trillion (Citi group). Today, the Metaverse could already be an $800 billion market (Bloomberg). In 2021, $44 billion worth of cryptocurrency was sent via smart contracts associated with Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs) marketplaces and collections (Chainalysis Inc).

Not a day goes by without a company or celebrity announcing that they are building a presence in a virtual universe. Christie's just hosted its first auction on a blockchain platform that was designed for bidding and securing transactions. H&M and Walmart are building new shopping experiences for their users to buy comfortably from home while still getting the kicks of going to the shopping mall. And of course, the biggest tech companies like Microsoft and Meta are competing to create the best-interconnected metaverse experience for its users, whether it's for play or work.

The combination of technological, social, and economic drivers have resulted in the explosive interest in the metaverse: Blockchain, Digital Currencies, Augmented Reality (AR) and Virtual Reality (VR), Non-Fungible Tokens (NFTs), DAOs (Decentralized Autonomous Organizations) and of course, Covid-19 which accelerated the digitization of our lives and normalized more persistent online engagement and communication.

The metaverse is the driving force that is bringing together all the elements of a new digital and technological age, making them converge at scale in a unified, immersive experience. We are now at an inflection point where leaders in industries like gaming, retail, real estate, arts, and education are determining how to position themselves as critical players in this emerging ecosystem. And it’s not just B2C, but also B2B and G2C (Government to Citizens).

While the Metaverse presents many opportunities for businesses and social life, it also faces some significant challenges. Designing the future of the law in the Metaverse is critical to ensuring safe digital experiences. As Metaverse grows in popularity, it must be protected from theft or fraud. Compliance with existing laws and regulations must be enforced too. Given that 20 minutes with a VR headset can collect about 2 million data, ensuring data protection should be more innovative than just placing a tick-the-box consent form at the entrance of Metaverse platforms. Finally, there is the question of liability, IP infringements and so much more …

Lawmakers and regulators need to work more closely with the developers to design the future of law in the metaverse. That's exactly what we'll discuss in this keynote speech with Tessa Manuello, founder and CEO of Legal Creatives.

In this Keynote hosted in the Metaverse itself, you will learn:

(1) Why the Metaverse is the biggest opportunity of our times;
(2) What are the Challenges and Opportunities of the Metaverse for the Legal Industry;
(3) How you can Design the Future of the Law in the Metaverse, today;
(4) Tools you can use to build your Metaverse presence now.

So, You Want a Dynamic Legal Team but Don’t Know What That Means or Where to Start? Here's How…

‘Dynamism’ has become such a buzz word in recent times. Companies aim to offer dynamic solutions for their clients that will pivot them to the next level. Organizations themselves aspire to be dynamic so that they can differentiate themselves from their competitors. In the human capital space, managers are on a drive to build dynamic teams.

While this term may be the new catchphrase, it arises from the realization that we need to adopt a different strategy to help us quickly adapt to the world that is constantly changing. The convergence of technologies has dissipated some industries, others have been consolidated and new ones created. The challenges that we face today require a different mind-and skillset because the practices of the past are no longer fit-for purpose.

The role of legal professionals can no longer just be that of risk mitigation. We need to transform ourselves to become value creators. This transformation requires us to have people who think and do things differently from us. We need people with different qualifications and expertise in our midst, whose skills and experience we can tap into to enhance our service offering. This diversity is just one way that leads to having a dynamic team.

How To Be a Lawyer That Helps Businesses Make Money

The world is changing rapidly. In response, businesses across the globe are continuously looking for ways to reinvent themselves and make data-driven decisions. They want to stay relevant and competitive.
Yet, despite what is happening within the business context, most lawyers are not updating their skill sets to adjust to the changing needs of businesses.
The risk is that you are becoming vulnerable to being replaced by your colleagues who are more aligned with the needs of the business. The question you should be asking is “How do I future-proof myself to be indisputably valuable to my organisation?”.

This session will provide you with practical actions you can take to:

  • Position yourself as distinct from the competition,
  • Add significant and evidence-based value to your organisation,
  • Enjoy your job while doing so.

IT'S MENTAL

The statistics are staggering: lawyers are 3.6 times more likely to be depressed compared to people in other jobs, while a landmark 2016 American Bar Association and Hazelden Betty Ford Foundation study found that 28% of lawyers suffer from depression. The study also showed that 19% have symptoms of anxiety and 21% meet the description of ‘problem drinkers’.

Join Elizabeth de Stadler from Rehabilitated Lawyer for some legal stand-up called IT’S MENTAL. She will take an irreverent and slightly offbeat look at this serious problem and offer some insights on challenging the status quo, changing the way we think about the law and being a lawyer and unlocking the #funlawyer in each of us. Join her and overthrow the system! We ride at dawn.

Insights on mental health, challenging the status quo and unlocking the #funlawyer in each of us!

Improve Your Legal Department's Efficiency with Legal Ops and Legal Tech

Given the growing amount of technological solutions available in the market, and external pressures that are pushing towards innovative and improved legal service delivery across the board. There is an increased need for in-house teams to focus less on mundane and routine tasks, and more on high-value transactional and strategic work. Part of this new imaged role for in-house counsel means understanding the legal technology landscape and the legal operational (legal ops) side of legal service delivery.

It follows that good technology cannot and will never solve a bad system or process, and this is where Legal Ops comes in. It is with this in mind that one cannot have a conversation about legal technology, without understanding, assessing, and improving their operations.
This session will focus on the following:

  • Kinds of legal tech available for the African market
  • Different Use cases for in-house legal teams' service delivery models •
  • Benefits of implementing legal tech • Barriers to adoption
  • Understanding Legal Ops
  • How to start their Legal Ops journey with limited resources

Discovering Your Creative Path: A Journey into Legal Design

Your creativity + the law: a force to be reckoned with. Legal design is a problem-solving methodology and mindset that helps build human-centered legal products, services and structures. How does legal design help reshape law? Why are empathy and creativity essential for tomorrow’s lawyers? And how do you transition into this creative role? ’

  • Intro, what can be better in traditional law practice
  • How legal design and creativity can help reshape law
  • My transition from traditional law practice into legal design
    Showcases + highlighting design elements and decisions (+behind the scenes)
  • What legal design can bring you
  • How to get started with legal design

Designing a Contract: From ‘Ignore’ to ‘More!

Designing a contract: from ‘Ignore’ to ‘More!’

 Learn how to design a contract for the actual people that will be using it. With hands-on exercises, we explore how to design your contracts so they fit their users’ – and other stakeholders’ - needs.

 

Failure to Launch: Ideation to Implementation

Scenario 1: Have you ever opened your inbox to an e-mail inviting you to a demo and training session for a new product that you may or may not have heard about? Your organisation has this “amazing” new digital tool and wants everyone to use it, but you’re busy and don’t have the time for whatever it is. The rest of your team maybe feels the same. As a result user adoption within the organisation has been slow or non-existent. If it’s happened to you, then it’s probably also happened with the users of your new innovation or digital solution.

Scenario 2: You have an idea that could make clients’ and colleagues' lives easier. After a lot of time and money has been spent, this project must succeed and that is usually when the change management journey begins. There’s marketing and demo sessions meaning more time and money investment. User adoption is sometimes only considered or thought about once a product is live and ready to use. We solve for low uptake not a quick adoption. I’m going to suggest it begins at ideation.

In this presentation we will share stories of some the successes and lessons learned in rolling out new products and services. We will look at scenarios where we have introduced new products for colleagues and new products for clients. In each story I will also share the role of the legal advisor in that process, from ideation to implementation.

  • Legal strategy in a digital project from ideation to implementation;
  • Tips and tricks on getting user adoption by your colleagues;
  • tips and tricks for user adoption when rolling out new products to clients

Structuring for Success

What drives successful digital transformation? Multidisciplinary, agile working? A digital mindset? The right technology? Customer centricity? Strategy? The answer, as we know, is all of the above. However, combining these diverse elements into a holistic programme of change is a challenge. How do organisations that are reaping the rewards of digital change structure themselves for success? And what can the legal industry learn from them?

In this session, we will explore the relationship between organisational structure, culture, technology, and successful digital transformation.

The session will look at a number of ‘typical’ models: a traditional law firm partnership; a law company; a Big 4 professional services organisation; a technology company and a corporate legal department. We will analyse how the organisational structure of each supports (or hinders) digital change and what organisations can do to lay the right foundations for a digital future.

1. How organisational structure can influence culture and change readiness.

2. The structural levers that organisations can pull to drive successful digital change.

3. How to become a more digital organisation without breaking the established structure.

Developing a Strategy for Legal Digital Transformation: An 8-Step Approach  

Successful digital organisations approach digital transformation as a strategic exercise, rather than as a series of disparate technology investments.  In this session, we will break down and explore the essentials of developing a digital vision and strategy for your law firm or organisation.

The session will cover:

  1. Understanding your law firm’s business strategy.
  2. Identifying opportunities to create digital value.
  3. Horizon scanning.
  4. Client focus.
  5. Creating a business case.
  6. Creating an implementation plan.
  7. Creating your communication assets.
  8. Communications and change management.

Digital Dexterity: (quoting Charles Dickens) ‘It was the best of times, it was the worst of times…”

Gartner describes digital dexterity as “the ability and desire to exploit existing and emerging technologies for better business outcomes”. In trying to find an efficient and effective way to improve the digital dexterity across our firm (legal and business services staff across 6 African countries), we ended up creating a bespoke Digital Dexterity course, compiled and facilitated by a combination of our partners, knowledge management, legal service improvement and developer (innovations) teams. Modules include data analytics, blockchain, document automation, BowBots (our popular, fun introduction to coding course) and AI (machine learning). The course (completed for the second time this year) and associated initiatives such as the Bowmans Tech Fest, Tech Talks and Tech Tips all worked together to continuously improve and encourage cross-functional and inter-office collaboration, ideation and solution implementation. Examples include matter management oversight and workflow automation, productised offerings, and enriching client conversations and workshops – all aimed at making optimal use of available solutions using a combination of diverse skills.

  • Learn more about our Digital Dexterity course and how to create something similar;
  • Examples of cross-functional collaboration;
  • Examples of productised offerings

Evolving Legal Practice From Paper Based Operations to Digital Solutions

As part of Telkom’s strategic digital transformation drive, the corporate legal department decided to adopt a digital approach to its legal operations, ideally by completely removing all paper-based and manual processes. There was also an emphasis on cost reduction and the need existed for matter-related data to be centralised and securely retained.

Telkom ultimately selected iManage Work together with the Co-Flo matter management system, to layer on top of iManage Work and the combined solution went live within a matter of months.

The chosen solution provides the required safety and security needed. The modular nature of the platform means that Telkom can add other functionality, within the existing install, as the department's requirements evolve.

Moving to a digital environment opens numerous business benefits.

Opening a new client matter requires little to no administrative assistance. Lawyers initiate new matters using the Co-Flo solution interface, and a whole host of data fields are automatically populated in Co-Flo and iManage Work. Similarly, when new matters are opened in Co-Flo, the matter management system triggers the creation of tailored workspaces in iManage that correspond to the specific matter type. Therefore, right from the start, lawyers are able to run their cases entirely from within iManage Work. The solution also offers high levels of integration with many Microsoft solutions, such as Outlook, Word, Excel, Teams and other key solutions used in a typical enterprise environment.

Further benefits of a transition to a digital environment include enhanced management capabilities, supervisory line-of-sight over matters and practitioners and the ability to further evolve the work cycle a long way down the digital evolution path.

In addition, the availability of a host of data provides the opportunity to continually manage the cost-effective provision of a legal service, whether in-house as in the case of Telkom, or in private practice.

Moving from paper based to digital legal practices; securing sensitive information; and driving enhanced efficiencies and cost reductions

Human Capital - The Decade's Greatest Challenge for Law Firms

As we transition to a post-COVID world, human capital will be the leading story for the rest of the decade. Law firms can’t exist without people, yet law firm strategy and investment in employee experience remains simplistic; social events and salary increases. This presentation will use Dan Pink's framework of human workplace needs (Mastery, Autonomy and Purpose) to give law firm leadership tools and ideas to create a unique culture and employee experience (including hybrid working models, innovation programs, and technology) so as to enhance lawyer/employee stickiness.

  • Creating Your Firm’s Innovation Programme
  • A step-by-step approach to creating a lasting innovation program and culture at your firm.

Creating Your Firm’s Innovation Programme

A step-by-step approach to creating a lasting innovation program and culture at your firm.

The Future of Legal Careers - How to Ensure You Are Future Fit

We will cover - How to prepare for and embrace the workforce of the future, how to attract and retain the best legal talent, and what skills businesses require to ensure future resilience and relevance? How to train the older workforce, how can your firm or company attract, retain and manage a workforce that will withstand the test of time and thrive in the era of digital disruption? Remote working, law firms v's alternatives. New legal careers like data technologists, legal data analysts & legal marketers. Legal process outsourcing and the impact thereof.

  1. What the legal jobs of the future look like
  2. What will the jobs be
  3. what skills will be needed to succeed

Transforming the Law Firm-Client Relationship – The Tangible Benefits of Innovation

Inhouse legal functions operate in an environment of rapid change and with ongoing pressure to reduce costs, and to deliver services more efficiently. These realities are forcing inhouse teams to transform their legal operations, and also to expect their law firm partners to independently identify cost-savings that are of benefit to them. Sharing directly from deep practical experience, Caryn will offer insights and practical guidance on how Gilbert + Tobin:

  1. Maximises it’s legal service delivery efficiencies from improved legal process, automation and use of legal technology;
  2. Developed a unique market-leading offering to deliver bespoke consultancy services to inhouse teams – for lawyers, by lawyers; and
  3. Has focused on developing a transformation mindset for lawyers – building capability across people, process and technology to enable the lawyer of the future.

Data Regulation: How to Implement Technological Solutions

Data is an exceptionally valuable resource – some even refer to data as the modern version of oil. Protecting this asset should be a central business concern, it should not – as is often the case – be considered an information technology or legal issue.

As we know, the Protection of Personal Information Act 4 of 2013 (‘POPIA’) provides the basis for regulating data protection in South Africa. It is based on international best practice, and in many respects, holistically speaking, is similar to the international gold standard General Data Protection Regulation (‘GDPR’).

POPIA and its Regulations provide that a responsible party (the term applicable to a person who processes personal information) must, amongst other things, perform a risk assessment and develop, implement, monitor, and maintain a compliance framework. In addition, responsible parties should conduct training and develop measures and systems to deal with data subject requests. This contribution will simplify these steps and attempt to demystify what is required to achieve data protection compliance; one cannot seek to comply with POPIA and implement software solutions unless a clear understanding of what is required is in place.

Further, this presentation will articulate whether technological solutions can achieve compliance, and review the detailed steps that responsible parties should take when using technology to either implement a compliance strategy, or to replace an existing one.

In addition, this presentation will discuss the role of the Information Regulator in South Africa, and comment on how it is planning to regulate the use of technology.
Given the ubiquitous nature of data, and the need to share it across jurisdictions, this contribution will examine cross border data flows in terms of POPIA, and comment on how to best manage this process.

Finally, the contribution will wrap up with a comparison of South Africa’s regulatory regime with foreign counterparts in the EU, England, and Australia.

Compliance with the the Protection of Personal Information Act; how to implement technological solutions; the role of the Information Regulator; international data transfers.

How to Flip a Pancake – Embracing The Bridge Between Law & Technological Advancements & Adding Value to Legal Processes Through Technological Innovation

People, Processes, Technology, and Data. The recipe for the best pancake in town.

Historically, the success and the size of a corporate law firm was defined by the amount of paper files, registered mail slips and legal secretaries that worked at the firm. And of course, the number of matters placed on the roll in a day.
The objective of the modern day law firm is understand how technology and automation can lead to value creation and cost reduction, without losing the integrity and sophistication that the legal profession holds. i.e the perfect pancake

Drivers of the perfect pancake :
People – flame
Processes – pancake batter
¬¬Technology – pan and the spatula
Data – chef

I will share with you how to :
1. Know your people to regulate the flame
2. How to innovate your processes without removing grandma’s secret ingredient
3. Investing in the technical innovation to have perfect pancakes every time
4. Train and refine your taste buds during the pancake process

Looking forward to flipping some pancakes with you.

1. Know your people to regulate the flame 2. How to innovate your processes without removing grandma’s secret ingredient 3. Investing in the technical innovation to have perfect pancakes every time 4. Train and refine your taste buds during the pancake process

NewLaw Careerists – The Next Legalpreneurs?

Legal practice today is not for the faint-hearted. It’s also not just for lawyers. Delivering legal services/products in a VUCA world requires a multitude of capabilities delivered by a multidisciplinary team. So, who does what in this new multidisciplinary legal team? Should/can lawyers work as technologists, project managers, consultants, data analysts or operations professionals? Should a law degree be a pre-requisite for a NewLaw career? What do career paths look like for all these professionals? And, what’s the business case for all of this?

In this session, Terri Mottershead will answer these questions and discuss:

  • The evolution of NewLaw careers (who they are and what they do)
  • How NewLaw professionals are transforming legal practice
  • The challenges and opportunities for NewLaw professionals

What the Tech Is Happening!

A glimpse into the not-so-distant future where a merger between the age-old discipline of LAW and tech becomes an integrated reality.

What does it mean to embrace technology as a catalyst for change? Law firms, legal expense insures and legal aid all play an important role in enabling access to justice to the people of South Africa.
So, we know what we are trying to achieve but how can technology enable this human-centric approach to justice.

In this session we will be looking at the various layers of technologies from enabler platforms such as cloud hosting, computing and PAAS services, process support solutions such as ELM (Enterprise Legal Management Software), knowledge bases, document automation and lastly movers and shakers such as block chain, smart contracts, and RPA (robotic process automation) and more.

At my company LAW FOR ALL we are busy building a next gen legal tech platform which empowers our legal professionals to be self-organising, respondent to change, collaborative, paperless and most importantly digital empowered. We will unpack some of the decisions made during this design process and how you can apply this design thinking to your business.

“The advance of technology is based on making it fit in so that you don't really even notice it, so it's part of everyday life.” - Bill Gates, Co-founder of Microsoft.

1. What is legal tech and the jargon surrounding it 2. Practical implementation within business. 3. What technologies are available ?

Why a Lawyer and a Laptop is Still Better at Chess Than a Robot. Lessons From The Frontier and a Team of Lawyers, Techies and Data Experts

Over the last 5 years, the team at Lighthouse has been hard at work building legal tech that helps to speed up contracting while at the same time managing risk. We have listened to the needs of our clients and designed technology focused on meeting those needs, while at the same time enabling the lawyers at Lighthouse to deliver their services more efficiently. The result is LightHub, our own legal tech offering.
We firmly believe that successful legal tech requires a balance of sophisticated technology and a deep understanding of legal services, with an overlay of data analytics and reporting. Our multi-disciplinary group of lawyers, technology experts, data analysts and marketing folks, has learned a lot on this journey and this is a great opportunity for us to share some of our experiences, including:
- the power of combining lawyers actively delivering legal services and technology experts who know what is truly achievable with tech,
- the value of a rich data set and accessible reporting – empowering leaders of legal and procurement teams to make informed decisions about work allocation, resourcing and capacity management, and
- the challenge of truly meeting client needs with a SaaS solution.
We still have a lot to learn but we are incredibly excited about the opportunities presented by legal tech in the near future – to enable our businesses to move forward fast and in line with their objectives, but importantly also to make life easier for all lawyers supporting those businesses. That said, we are realistic about some of the hype, including AI, and we will provide a frank assessment of how we think AI can work and when it doesn’t.

1. Ways in which the combination of legal tech and the layer can be used to optimal effect; 2. Some helpful lessons learned about what works and is readily available in the legal tech market and what is missing in the current legal tech landscape; 3. A view of what we can expect from the world of legal tech in the next 5 years - with a particular perspective on the role of AI.

Why a Lawyer and a Laptop is Still Better at Chess Than a Robot. Lessons From The Frontier and a Team of Lawyers, Techies and Data Experts

Over the last 5 years, the team at Lighthouse has been hard at work building legal tech that helps to speed up contracting while at the same time managing risk. We have listened to the needs of our clients and designed technology focused on meeting those needs, while at the same time enabling the lawyers at Lighthouse to deliver their services more efficiently. The result is LightHub, our own legal tech offering.
We firmly believe that successful legal tech requires a balance of sophisticated technology and a deep understanding of legal services, with an overlay of data analytics and reporting. Our multi-disciplinary group of lawyers, technology experts, data analysts and marketing folks, has learned a lot on this journey and this is a great opportunity for us to share some of our experiences, including:
- the power of combining lawyers actively delivering legal services and technology experts who know what is truly achievable with tech,
- the value of a rich data set and accessible reporting – empowering leaders of legal and procurement teams to make informed decisions about work allocation, resourcing and capacity management, and
- the challenge of truly meeting client needs with a SaaS solution.
We still have a lot to learn but we are incredibly excited about the opportunities presented by legal tech in the near future – to enable our businesses to move forward fast and in line with their objectives, but importantly also to make life easier for all lawyers supporting those businesses. That said, we are realistic about some of the hype, including AI, and we will provide a frank assessment of how we think AI can work and when it doesn’t.

1. Ways in which the combination of legal tech and the layer can be used to optimal effect; 2. Some helpful lessons learned about what works and is readily available in the legal tech market and what is missing in the current legal tech landscape; 3. A view of what we can expect from the world of legal tech in the next 5 years - with a particular perspective on the role of AI.

Would You Negotiate With A Hacker - I Did - Let Me Explain Why

“We come in peace – we mean you no harm” this was the greeting line of a threat actor after they hacked and encrypted a large organization in South Africa and demanded a king's ransom. Have you ever wondered how a syndicate selects their victim, or how they are able to break into even the most secure environment seemingly effortlessly? – then come and listen to an overview on the main cyber threats facing organizations in SA and how an attack plays out. The process of how a Cyber Incident is manage will be explored as well as the process of negotiating with the hackers - if (absolutely) necessary. The ethical and legal challenges and consequences which comes with considering paying a ransom will also be discussed.

Data Subject Access Requests (DSAR), emanating from a data breach which are relatively new in the South African Environment that can follow such a data breach can become a nightmare for an organization. The application of eDiscovery platforms in such situations will be discussed and how it can alleviated the analysis of large datasets.

Remember - Cybercrime is a reality and each organization should consider WHEN it happens how will you handle it and not IF it happens to you.

How to advise clients who suffered a cyber breach, What Cyber Threats organisations face in SA,How technology such as eDiscovery platforms can assist legal teams to work through large data sets when preparing for cases

Lawyer 4:0 - Rethink Reframe Reimagine

How can we engage and inspire the next generation of lawyers?
Legal professionals are being challenged to rethink the way they do business and evolve their skillset to keep up with the pace of change.

In this session, we explore how to build agile legal teams and identify tools that will empower them to reimagine legal delivery and optimize their performance.

  • Tools to to build agile legal teams.
  • Methods to enhance legal delivery for optimized performance.

Removing the Flops from Legal Ops

It feels like a minefield out there for legal teams and law firms. We can’t clone resources, slow down time or get to that utopia promised by the hundreds of technologies competing for our money. At the same time, data is flooding in and there is a battle raging for talent and expertise.

In an interactive panel discussion, featuring Exigent and a financial institution, we will share our experiences on how to optimize legal operations, leverage the right legal technology and bring your teams along for the ride. You will discover how to adopt a legal operations mindset to meet the inevitable challenges and set yourself up for success.

How the Rise in Data Complexity and Volume Is Driving the Need for Legal Technology Innovation

Removing the Flops from Legal Ops

It feels like a minefield out there for legal teams and law firms. We can’t clone resources, slow down time or get to that utopia promised by the hundreds of technologies competing for our money. At the same time, data is flooding in and there is a battle raging for talent and expertise.

In an interactive panel discussion, featuring Exigent and a financial institution, we will share our experiences on how to optimize legal operations, leverage the right legal technology and bring your teams along for the ride. You will discover how to adopt a legal operations mindset to meet the inevitable challenges and set yourself up for success.

Removing the Flops from Legal Ops

It feels like a minefield out there for legal teams and law firms. We can’t clone resources, slow down time or get to that utopia promised by the hundreds of technologies competing for our money. At the same time, data is flooding in and there is a battle raging for talent and expertise.

In an interactive panel discussion, featuring Exigent and a financial institution, we will share our experiences on how to optimize legal operations, leverage the right legal technology and bring your teams along for the ride. You will discover how to adopt a legal operations mindset to meet the inevitable challenges and set yourself up for success.

Panel Discussion; Insights, Reflections & A look into the Future of The Legal Profession

The Convergance of Tech and Law - The New Tech Revolution

This presentation is about the necessary convergence of Tech and Law, with an emphasis on blockchain use cases.

Maurice as a specialist in blockchain legal matters, will share some of his experiences and current uses for blockchain, and the legal instruments that Schindlers Si have created in the blockchain space, including the process of creating NFT addresses over trust land to enable the occupants to securitise it – what he refer to as a “layer two deeds office”. Raising questions such as whether it’s possible to create a blockchain layer two deeds office despite our conveyancing laws? Can you transfer your house on your phone, without a conveyancer, whilst the deeds office remains as is? Will conveyancing survive long enough to make it worthwhile writing the exam?

He will also share how one can tokenise assets legally. Meaning, to fractionalise a house or car into billions of tokens, that can be traded internationally, as well as what security token offerings entail.

He will touch on questions such as whether there will be any room for the JSE with the increase of token exchanges, what tax advantages arise from blockchain use cases, as well as the processes and needs for NFT Auditing.

Maurice will go on to discuss metaverses and how legacy legal systems can have no application to them, with reference to two metaverse projects Schindlers SI is presently involved in. Maurice will discuss how disputes will be resolved in the metaverse, considering privacy and anonymity will be paramount.

Don’t miss out as Maurice dives deep into the Fourth Industrial Revolution and its impact on law and its practitioners.

The Fourth Industrial Revolution is as much about Law as it is about Tech